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dirtypeanut:

Cosplay comics from Think.Nu

isitscary:

My daughter is blind! She is blind and tiny and helpless and fragile. She cannot help you!

captainamuricasass:

I wanna be

where the people are

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Book review #5

Batman/Superman Volume 1: Cross World

Written by Greg Pak and Illustrated by Jae Lee

This is the first in a series of the DC Comics New 52 Batman/Superman comics that are dark and foreboding. The art features very mute colors with splashes of vibrance in a sharp, edgy art style with very light and even implied line, giving it a floating, distressed quality, which is perfect for this story.

It is written by Greg Pak, who is better known for this work on Marvel comics such as X-treme Xmen and some titles about The Hulk. The illustrator, Jae Lee, is a South Korean artist who is also better-known among Marvel comics than DC with major work on Marvel’s Dark Tower series (2003-2009) and Captain America (2003).

The story takes place alternatively between two earths, Earth and Earth 2 and features a Batman and Superman from each, totaling four. one set of Batman and Superman are younger versions of the Batman and Superman that are usually seen in DC comics, and have not fully honed their skills. Younger Superman cannot fly yet, though he can jump impressive distances and younger Batman has a temper. The two Earths timelines are brought together by Kaiyo, the Chaos Bringer, who is searching for worlds with heroes who can conquer Darkseid, DC’s main villain who spans several comic story arcs, such as Justice League by Geoff Johns. Though unlike in the Justice League story arc, this story arc explores Darkseid’s beginnings and motivations are to being the main antagonist in the collective DC New 52 stories.

Since the story alternates between two worlds and several places on each earth, there is a lot to keep track of: who is talking, which Batman or Superman is being referred to, their respective inner monologues, plus side characters like Lois Lane and Catwoman, who both play a prominent part in sections of the story. Wonder Woman is also in this story, adding yet another voice to the squabbles in each jam-packed chapter.

The switching back and forth between places and times can be confusing and this comic would be best for those who have some familiarity with the characters and those who are able to follow the ever more complicated time shifts as the story unfolds. Background information is a definite must with this comic. Try reading some original Batman and Superman comics before attempting to read this volume.

This comic would not be a good place to start if one is just becoming acquainted with superhero comic books. This comic is one of the more self-involved stories and requires a lot of dedication. Given its content, this comic is aimed at an adult audience. The dark themes of this comic give it a very serious tone, one that a younger reader might find tiring but there is nothing to keep young adults from reading it as well.

WorldCat Record: http://www.worldcat.org/title/batmansuperman-volume-1-cross-world/oclc/867717079&referer=brief_results

rebekyboo:

timelordy-teganbreann:

seblaine:

australian adverts are slowly becoming my favourite

omg

rebekyboo:

timelordy-teganbreann:

seblaine:

australian adverts are slowly becoming my favourite

omg

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ohmaglor:

The Elves have their own labours and their own sorrows, and they are little concerned with the ways of hobbits, or of any other creatures upon earth



Dorks.
Dorks.

cerviceps:

I also found this $5 toothless figurine at target and it was already pretty cute but I went “how can I make this even cuter

here’s what the original toothless figurine looked like, pre-painting (I forgot to take before pics so here’s a picture of it from amazon). I also filled in some gaps in his tail with epoxy putty and sanded his edges a little.

Toothless's I'm-so-done-with-you-Hiccup face
Book Review #3 

Justice League #1: Origin  A New 52 Comic

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This comic is the first in a new story arc in which the Justice League is formed. This comic does not address how the seven heroes gain their powers, save Cyborg, who is a new addition to the team, in loo of Martian Manhunter, who has been cut all together in this new serialization. The story is written by Geoff Johns who also rebooted Aquaman, Green Lantern and The Flash for the New 52 DC universe. The illustrators are Jim Lee and Scott Williams, who are prominent illustrators for the New 52 as well.

The main intent of this first volume is to show how the Justice League came to be. The story begins with Batman being chased by the Gotham police when Green Lantern shows up, asking questions. Batman and Green Lantern then team up to follow an alien creature with a contraption that they are curious about. From there, Superman enters and combat ensues with the aliens. As the rest of the Justice League comes together for the first time, they must fight the alien evil, Darseid, who is threatening Earth. The Justice League must figure out what the strange alien contraption is, before it is too late.

This comic is drawn in a bold style, muscly men and women in form-fitting suits and armor. The dialogue and art compliment each other  for this action-packed first installment of a new series.

It also has a great deal of humor that a reader would enjoy and the action is easy to follow as well. The whole comic flows evenly the whole time and the art has pleasing bright use of color and strong lines to indicate the action that is constant in this comic.

Like most comics geared toward a mainly male audience, the few women in this comic, Wonder Woman and Pandora and a few other minor characters, wear form-fitting clothes and are shown at angles where their bodies are best displayed but this comic also shows a lot of the men this way as well, which evens the score, but is still not a needed feature.

While a reader does not need to understand the in-depth customs of any one culture to understand this comic, it is heavily geared toward those living in the United States, since that is where it is written and

This comic is definitely geared toward adults and young adults though there is no foul language in this volume and it is an easily understandable comic. Children would be able to read this with considerable ease, and this comic would make a great general introduction to the superhero portrayed in comic books, given that this is the first volume in a series and is accessible to those not familiar with the old Justice League or DC comics.

In conclusion, those who enjoy action and fast-paced stories with a science fiction twist and multiple main characters would like this comic. There is nothing subtle about this story. There is no mystery to solve, like in many Batman story lines, and as of yet, no romantic intrigue. The action is the main force of the story and the coming together of a group of supernatural heroes. While knowing the back stories of each of the seven main characters would enrich the reading of Justice League: Origin but is not necessary. Even if a reader read this first, and then the origin comics of each of the other Justice League members afterward, this story will still makes sense. All the Justice League members stories, besides Cyborg who’s origin is shown in this volume, are told in separate stand-alone comics. 

WorldCat Record: http://www.worldcat.org/title/justice-league-volume-1-origin/oclc/768799403&referer=brief_results

deulsso:

7/19
#HappyBirthdayBenedictCumberbatch 

deulsso:

7/19

#HappyBirthdayBenedictCumberbatch